The (Inevitable) Post About NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo 2017 Participant BannerIt’s October.  And you know what that means.  No, not Halloween.  It means we only have a few weeks before the biggest noveling event in the world begins.  

I’m going to assume that everyone knows what NaNoWriMo is, since you’re on a writing blog.   However, if you’re feeling rather clueless, you can find out more about it at the link.  nanowrimo.org/about

And, of course, I’ve already extensively planned my entire book, and am all ready to start a killer novel.  *laughs nervously*  No.  I told myself last year that everything would be planned out, down to the tiniest detail.  I was frantically planning on October 31, and I’m pretty sure I had only gotten to the first chapter by November 1.  It’s probably going to be the same this year.
Continue reading

Advertisements

I Attempt a Rewrite

I found a notebook while cleaning my room recently.  (You find all sorts of things when you clean your room, don’t you?)  I was curious, and flipped the notebook open.  I started reading.  Then I remembered I wrote a story on a long car trip in that notebook when I was in fourth grade or somewhere around that age.  I got about a quarter a way through writing the story until I quit because it was basically a Magic Tree House book.  

I still regard it as my first major foray into writing, however.  (I don’t count the numerous fifteen sentence stories I wrote as a kindergartner.)

So, to see how far I’ve come, I decided to rewrite a portion of the story. Continue reading

My Biggest Pet Peeves in Romance

 

biggest pet peeves in romance.PNG

Alrighty.  Those of you who know me in real life know that I’m not a hopeless romantic.  I’m not a anti-love person, I just have a lot of problems with the way it’s presented in media.  This post isn’t going to focus on that as much as the cliches I see over and over in books.  

This post could go on and on, but I’m going to focus on a few main areas.  The “Insert Love Interest So Readers will Read My Book” trend, and the “Love at First Sight,” and “Damsel In Distress” cliches. Continue reading

The Clock Master

clock master.PNG

This is a story that I wrote as part of CWWC.  You may have noticed the banner on the sidebar, and this is for that.  The good stories will be posted on the blog, but if you’re brave, you can read the others, which will be posted on the CWWC tab on the menu.  

I’ve never liked time travel stories.  (I don’t know why, I just don’t like them.)  This is as far as I’ll go when writing time travel.  So… enjoy. Continue reading

Rebellious Writing

Maybe you’ve seen a few posts and stuff with the hashtag RebelliousWriting.  When I found out what it was, I jumped on the bandwagon.  I’m not usually one to do stuff like this, but I emphasize with the message.  

So, Aster, now that you’ve rambled on for a few sentences, what is Rebellious Writing?

It’s a movement started by Gray from graymariewrites. Since she put it so eloquently, I’ll just paste what she wrote.

#RebelliousWriting is a movement that demands for wholesome books. Books that are full of light, good morals, family, friendships, and adventures, instead of books full of darkness, swearing, sex, vile relationships, and lust. Let’s rebel against the social book standards that scream at us to fit in, in order to be cool or relevant.

Continue reading

Psychopaths, Sociopaths, and Villains

Adobe Spark (10)

Okay, okay, it’s a weird post title, I know.  I’m NOT saying that if someone has a mental illness, they’re a villain.  But, I’m going to discuss how mental illnesses can affect your villain, for the better or the worse.

A word of caution:  I don’t recommend writing a villain with a mental illness unless you’ve had experience, done tons of research, or have talked to someone who is knowledgeable about the mental illness that you are considering giving to your villain.

Now that we’ve got that cleared up, let’s see how mental illnesses affect villains.

Obviously, something is a little off in the head of a villain if they’re a villain.  But sometimes, it’s a little more than being “a bit off.”  Out of curiosity, I started researching Continue reading

The Many Positions of a Writer

Writers and their weird poses and positions.  This is a widely used guide by all writers about the wheres, hows, and whens of writing places, poses, and times. 

(Warning:  This may be dangerous information for the beginning writer.  If you like writing in one position, at one place, stay away.  You stay just how you are.  It’ll be better for your posture in the long run.) Continue reading

Historical Writing Prompts

Adobe Spark (9)It’s been a while since we’ve had a round of writing prompts on here.  I decided to branch out and do historical prompts.  This place was getting bogged down with all the fantasy prompts.  

Now, I don’t write historical.  I tried to write a short story set in the Great Depression, but it turned into a miserable failure.  (Actually, my seven year old brother read it over my shoulder while I typed it, and I asked him for help.  The plot didn’t improve, so I’ll blame that story’s failure on him. But he liked the story.)

These historical fiction prompts are going to be something unique because–guess what– they all happened in history!  (I know, historical fiction normally is set in history, but hear me out.)  

These prompts were all in the newspaper and they caught my eye.  These are real life prompts, taken from headlines and articles in newspapers a long time ago.  Some are quite humorous, and I daresay you’ll like them whether you write historical or not. Continue reading