The Girl Who Could See- Book Review

I said I’d be doing a lot of reading.  It was only a matter of time until a book review popped up.  Actually, you might see a lot of book reviews because I’ve been reading like crazy.  (I read three books yesterday.  Finished one, and read two more from cover to cover.  Crazy.  They were the Blades of Acktar series by Trisha Mingerink, if you’re curious.)

But this was the first book I read during my summer break.  I was super excited for the book when I first heard of it, because I thought it sounded amazing and the cover art is gorgeous!  

The premise was super cool, and I went into this book with high expectations.  That’s dangerous for me because I rarely have high expectations for books.  If I have high expectations, they’re more likely than not to get dashed.  If I don’t have high expectations and the book is good, I’ll be pleasantly surprised, but if it’s not, I don’t suffer any loss.  

But The Girl Who Could See, by Kara Swanson, met all those expectations.

“All her life Fern has been told she is blind to reality—but what if she is the only one who can truly see?

Fern Johnson is crazy. At least, that’s what the doctors have claimed since her childhood. Now nineteen, and one step away from a psych ward, Fern struggles to survive in bustling Los Angeles. Desperate to appear “normal,” she represses the young man flickering at the edge of her awareness—a blond warrior only she can see.

Tristan was Fern’s childhood imaginary hero, saving her from monsters under her bed and outside her walls. As she grew up and his secret world continued to bleed into hers, however, it only caused catastrophe. But, when the city is rocked by the unexplainable, Fern is forced to consider the possibility that this young man isn’t a hallucination after all—and that the creature who decimated his world may be coming for hers.” -from back cover

I was really interested because the book revolved around schizophrenia and imaginary friends, both of which I thought would be good in a book.  Really, it’s a novella, but it was the perfect length for me.  Any longer and it would have felt way too long.

The Characters:

Fern (aka Plant Girl):  Fern is a strong heroine who just wants to take care of her niece.  Doing so means that she needs to keep her job.  It’s easier said than done.  She’s lost two jobs in the past two months because of accidents related to her schizophrenia.  In fact, her illness is so bad that she had to drop out of high school.  Even before that, her parents were a part of a drug dealership, and often had the children pedal the drugs for them.  Despite it all, she’s a determined girl.

Tristan: Tristan is imaginary friend of Fern.  He saved her when she was little, and always keeps an eye on her.  Plus he has so much snarky, sarcastic, happy.  (Ignore the grammar.)

What I liked:

The concept was well executed.  There were a few time jumps, but I was able to keep track of them with no trouble.  The book is written in first person present, which normally drives me nuts, but I didn’t even notice until I was a few chapters into it.  There was some romance, but it wasn’t a lot.  It’s not a Christian book, but it is really clean.  (The author is a daughter of missionaries.)

What I didn’t like:

There was some slightly unbelievable things that I noticed going back through a second time.  (I like it so much that I read the book twice in one day.  That’s saying something.)  However, they weren’t glaring, and given the genre, it didn’t matter too much.  There was one kiss that went a little too long.  (While this is something I’m neutral on, I’ll advise: There is quite a bit of violence, but never too gory, and there is some thematic stuff.)

WRITING: 5/5 STARS
CHARACTERS: 4.5/5 STARS
PLOT: 4.5/5
THEMATIC STUFF (1 NONE, 5 HIGH): 2

(Drugs, kidnapping, monsters,)

LEVEL OF VIOLENCE (1 BEING NONE, 5 BEING HIGH): 3

(A few people are killed.  Tristan fights with two flails, which he uses.)

LANGUAGE: (1 BEING NONE, 5 BEING HIGH): 1

Total: Four and a half stars.  (I rounded up to five.)

IT’S SUMMER!!!!!!!!

I have a pressing question.  What do Australians do?  Do they start the school year in September, and then work through the summer (our winter) then get their summer break with snow?  Do you start in April and stop in November?  What happens?  If you’re an Aussie, please comment and tell me because summer without swimming and flip flops sounds sad.  (Of course, it could just be a plain answer, like you start in the same month as pretty much everyone else.)

But if you’re reading this, that means that I finished school, which to me, is the definition of summer. Continue reading

Summer and Swimming

Hiya people.  It’s almost summer!!!  [It feels like it already, (already had the first sunburn of the season) but we have to wait a few more days for it to be official.]

Sorry for lack of posts…  I won’t even make up an excuse.  So saying, the schedule for this is going to change a little.  Haha, like I had a schedule in the first place… Continue reading

Psychopaths, Sociopaths, and Villains

Adobe Spark (10)

Okay, okay, it’s a weird post title, I know.  I’m NOT saying that if someone has a mental illness, they’re a villain.  But, I’m going to discuss how mental illnesses can affect your villain, for the better or the worse.

A word of caution:  I don’t recommend writing a villain with a mental illness unless you’ve had experience, done tons of research, or have talked to someone who is knowledgeable about the mental illness that you are considering giving to your villain.

Now that we’ve got that cleared up, let’s see how mental illnesses affect villains.

Obviously, something is a little off in the head of a villain if they’re a villain.  But sometimes, it’s a little more than being “a bit off.”  Out of curiosity, I started researching Continue reading

The Many Positions of a Writer

Writers and their weird poses and positions.  This is a widely used guide by all writers about the wheres, hows, and whens of writing places, poses, and times. 

(Warning:  This may be dangerous information for the beginning writer.  If you like writing in one position, at one place, stay away.  You stay just how you are.  It’ll be better for your posture in the long run.) Continue reading

Historical Writing Prompts

Adobe Spark (9)It’s been a while since we’ve had a round of writing prompts on here.  I decided to branch out and do historical prompts.  This place was getting bogged down with all the fantasy prompts.  

Now, I don’t write historical.  I tried to write a short story set in the Great Depression, but it turned into a miserable failure.  (Actually, my seven year old brother read it over my shoulder while I typed it, and I asked him for help.  The plot didn’t improve, so I’ll blame that story’s failure on him. But he liked the story.)

These historical fiction prompts are going to be something unique because–guess what– they all happened in history!  (I know, historical fiction normally is set in history, but hear me out.)  

These prompts were all in the newspaper and they caught my eye.  These are real life prompts, taken from headlines and articles in newspapers a long time ago.  Some are quite humorous, and I daresay you’ll like them whether you write historical or not. Continue reading

Blue Sky Tag

 reaction disney live mulan i live GIF

Hi all of you out there!  *waves*  It’s been a long while.  But I have returned! (From TeenPact, sickness, and school.)

I’ve been tagged with the Blue Sky Tag by Hailey of haileyhudson.wordpress.com.  Go check out her blog, it’s inspiring. 🙂

That means I’m answering a whole bunch of questions, then nominating some more people for my own questions.   Continue reading

Animal Farm-Book Review

animal farm book review

I have a penchant for reading banned books, apparently.  

Though this one isn’t as pleasant as To Kill A Mockingbird.  It’s actually really depressing, but a thought-provoking read.

Animal Farm is actually a fairy tale.  No, not the fairy tales of princesses and dragons.  It’s specifically a book written with flat characters.  Character arcs are few and far in between.  Continue reading